Medication-Assisted Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treatment Programs

We Partner with Board-Certified Addiction Medicine Physicians

Utilizing medications that include Suboxone and Naltrexone, clients participate in best practices behavioral and medical treatments. Lionrock coordinates the care so that clients have a seamless experience.

Why Medication-Assisted Treatment?

Research suggests that a combination of medication and behavioral therapies can be the most effective way to treat addiction/substance use disorders.

Behavioral therapies help clients modify their attitudes and behaviors related to drug and alcohol abuse, and increase healthy life skills. Medications used to treat the physiological aspects of substance use disorders help people stay in treatment longer, which allows clients to develop deeper skills in relapse prevention and more time to build key recovery support into their lives.

A Commitment to Both Behavioral and Pharmacological Therapies

Clients who qualify for Lionrock’s MAT program commit to participating in both therapy types. We do not offer medication-only treatment.

More Info? Call Us at 800.258.6550

——-

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a prescription medication that includes the drugs buprenorphine and naloxone.

Buprenorphine is an “opioid partial agonist”. Like other opioids such as heroin or hydrocodone/oxycontin, buprenorphine can induce euphoria and respiratory depression. Because buprenorphine is a only “partial agonist” these effects are weaker than with full opioids. Being a “weak” opioid allows buprenorphine to plug into the same receptors in an addicted person’s brain that need the presence of an opioid to maintain a feeling of well-being.

Learn more about Suboxone here.

What is Naltrexone?

Naltrexone hydrochloride is a pure opioid receptor antagonist. This means that, similarly to Naloxone, it completely blocks the effects of opioids in the body. Clinical tests of Naltrexone as an aid in the treatment of alcohol dependency have shown significant positive results.

Learn more about Naltrexone here.